Myanmar (Burma) through my eyes. (Photos part 2)

8

February 20, 2013 by farbolino

These photos start with photos of the surrounding town near U Bein bridge and include photos from a 3 day trek from Namsung to Hsipaw, and photos taken on the train from Hsipaw to Pyin Oo Lwin. As always, all photos were taken with an iPhone only.

20130220-145332.jpg20130220-145710.jpg20130220-150000.jpg20130220-150019.jpg20130220-150048.jpg20130220-145906.jpg20130220-150112.jpg20130220-150604.jpg20130220-150536.jpg20130220-150738.jpg20130220-150755.jpg20130220-150812.jpg20130220-150932.jpg

20130220-151103.jpg

20130220-151031.jpg

20130220-151214.jpg

20130220-151118.jpg

20130220-151359.jpg

20130220-151423.jpg

20130220-151257.jpg

20130220-165814.jpg

20130220-165844.jpg

20130220-152018.jpg

20130220-170304.jpg

20130220-165957.jpg

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Myanmar (Burma) through my eyes. (Photos part 2)

  1. I’m so excited to go there! Thanks for these pictures – make it so tempting.

  2. dakota85 says:

    Gorgeous photos- Burma remains one of my most favorite countries to explore, I hope you’re loving the people and landscape. Such a unique, magical place!! What are some of your “top” experiences so far?

    • farbolino says:

      Thanks for the compliment. Unfortunately I left Myanmar 2 weeks ago after I maxed out my 28 day visa. I travel slow as sights aren’t my first priority, but experiencing the (very alive) cultural differences, meeting the people, etc.
      I’d say Yangon and Mandalay were great simply for walking around and talking to people. The stark difference between the two cities is also amazing.
      Then I’d have to say trekking from Namsang to Hsipaw without a guide was truly amazing. The people in the villages were so surprised and welcoming. Plus sleeping overnight in Owntat monastery was wonderful after trekking for 7-8 hours.
      Lastly in a smaller town of Yenangyaung, I stayed at a guesthouse called Lei Thai Gone (Gentle Breeze Inn). The owner Eric helps orphans with the profits from the guesthouse and has done a number of projects already including providing clean drinkable water for villages that would otherwise have to walk miles to get it. He’s currently building a school where the local children can learn English. I enjoyed this experience on multiply levels, but most of all I felt like I really learned how hard things can be for these people who live in the driest region in Myanmar.
      I hope to be able to go again and when I do, I’ll be sure to pick up some MTT permits to visit the north.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Enter your email address to follow this blog and receive notifications of new posts by email.

Join 900 other followers

%d bloggers like this: